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An e-bike sharing company co-founded by Usain Bolt seems to have turn off

An e-bike- and scooter-sharing startup co-founded by Olympian Usain Bolt seems to have turn off operations, highlighting recent problems in the micromobility sector, TechCrunch has reported. Bolt Mobility was within around five cities including Portland, Burlington, Vermont and Richmond in California, alongside others via an acquisition, plus some of these are facing abandoned equipment and unanswered calls.

“We learned a month or more ago (from their website) that Bolt is ceasing operations,” a transportation planner in Chittenden County, Vermont, told TechCrunch. “Theyve vanished, leaving equipment behind and emails and calls unanswered. Were not able to attain anyone, nonetheless it seems theyve closed shop in other markets aswell.”

Bolt Mobility actually expanded no less than 18 months ago, purchasing the assets of Last Mile Holdings, which operated Gotcha and OjO Electric. That exposed 48 new markets to the business in mostly smaller cities like Raleigh, NC and Mobile, Alabama. (Bolt Mobility isn’t to be confused with the Bolt ride-sharing and scooter app in Europe.)

However, Bolt Mobility lost its permit to use in Portland in July because of problems with insurance and outstanding fees. A spokesperson in Burlington said that around 100 bikes were left inoperable sufficient reason for dead batteries, with the town telling the business to claim them prior to the country takes ownership. “Our contacts at Bolt, including their CEO, have gone radio silent and also have not replied to your emails,” a Burlington representative said.

As CrunchBase reported earlier, scooter startups like Bird have hit the skids after starting as billion-dollar “unicorns.” Bird’s problem is actually that it charges a good amount of cash, around $6 for a 20-minute rental a lot greater than a metro or bus ride.t Bird lost plenty of profit 2020 after consuming just $79 million in revenue down 40 percent over 2019. Carrying out a SPAC merge, it’s stock price has subsequently cratered from $10 to just over 50 cents today.

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