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How PEOPLE WHO HAVE VeryHigh Emotional Intelligence Utilize the ‘Fortune Cookie Rule’ to Become Super-Resilient

I believe we should focus on the senior high school humor, and work our way toward the emotional intelligence.

When I was an adolescent, some friends and I used to frequenta Chinese restaurant. A woman who was type of the biggest market of the group and the life span of the party-;let’s call her Jessica-;introduced us to a “PG-13” joke that you almost certainly know.

Itwent such as this. By the end of each meal, we’d get fortune cookies, and we’d browse the fortunes aloud. Then, we’d pause and appearance at Jessica.

With perfect timing, she’d add the sametwo words to the finish of every fortune: “During intercourse.”

  • For instance, my fortune might read: “Focus, determination, and effort will always pay back…”
  • And Jessica would add, “During intercourse!”

It made nearly every fortune funny:

  • “Challenge and adventure awaits!” (“Inbed.”)
  • “Your road to success could be bumpy, nonetheless it may also be glorious.” (“During intercourse.”)
  • “Everyone understands fear, however, not everyone learns bravery. (“During intercourse.”)

Here we have been, decades later, and I cannot imagine of a lot of money cookie without automatically adding thewords, “during intercourse.”

OK.Enough about memory lane. Let’s fast-forward for this, and how people who have high emotionalintelligence figure out how to utilize this trick, which we’re calling the Fortune Cookie Rule, to become especiallyresilient.

The Fortune Cookie Rule is abouttraining you to ultimately reclassify nearly every criticism or rejection in order that it encourages you instead of discourages you — or at the very least falls in to the realm of the irrelevant-;by understanding how to append simple, silent phrases to it in your thoughts.

I started realizing this techniqueafter detecting a pattern in the manner that a great number of successful people described overcoming initial rejection.

It wasn’t decreasing phenomenon initially. The descriptions always appeared to can be found in the context of longer discussions, and nobody really mentioned emotional intelligence.

Also, these folks seemedto apply the technique almost instinctively — or at the very least without putting a name on which these were doing.

But if they called it anything or not, itreally was about emotional intelligence.

Here’s a good example. Recently, we interviewed the mega-best-selling author, James Patterson, for my daily newsletter at Understandably.com.

One small section of our wide-ranging discussion centered on how Patterson reacted to the 31 rejections he got before his first novel was finally accepted.

In a nutshell, as Patterson described it, he learned never to hear, “rejection.” Instead, he somehow always heard: “That one isn’t right for me personally, but maybe the next one.”

Another example: Brian Acton is really a multi-billionaire and the former co-founder of WhatsApp. Back 2009, he was an effective programmer who nevertheless kept getting rejected for high-profile jobs and documenting his rejections on Twitter.

Examples:

Got denied by Twitter HQ. That’s ok. Is a long commute.

-; Brian Acton (@brianacton) May 23, 2009

And:

Facebook turned me down. It had been a great possibility to connect to some fantastic people. Looking towards life’s next adventure.

-; Brian Acton (@brianacton) August 3, 2009

Each account is indeed cheery. That which was it that led him to simply accept them and discover the bright side?It’s partly about confidence, but additionally about context: Just understanding how to view rejection as though there’s obviously another part left unsaid that could explain it in a confident or neutral way.

Let me add just one single more example, since I’m big in to the Rule of 3s.

Think about Brian Chesky, co-founder and CEO of Airbnb, who once shared verbatim a few of the no-thank-you emails he and his co-founders got after being introduced to the highest-profile investors in Silicon Valley:

  • Investor No.1:Not inside our section of focus…
  • Investor No. 2:The potential market opportunity didn’t seem large enough for the required model.
  • Investor No. 3:Its not in another of our fiveprime target markets, so its an extended shot for involvement.
  • Investor No. 4:I like the progress you guys have made, but between issues outstanding with ABB and my current time commitments to other projects Im not likely to have the ability to proceed.
  • Investor No. 5:Weve always struggled with travel as a category. We recognize it’s among the top e-commerce categories but also for some reason, weve not had the opportunity to get worked up about travel-related businesses.

It is possible to read these as rejections — plus they were — but each one of these also explained an acceptable rationale.I couldn’t help but read them and wonder:

O.K., what did Chesky tell himself to be able to put the rejections in the group of “not right for me personally” rather than assuming they implied the more discouraging, “not right for anybody?”

That’s where emotional intelligence will come in. Because the facts are that whether you’re starting an organization, or searching for a job, or attempting to publish a novel, whenever someone rejects you, you’re more than likely playing a version of the old “‘in bed’ by the end of a lot of money cookie” game.

Many individuals add negative, unsaid phrases to criticism. (They’re rejecting me because “my idea isn’t sufficient,” or “I’ll never achieve success,” or “I’m a whole imposter.”)

But emotionally intelligent people figure out how to transform it around and put in a different sort of phrase that may hint at other circumstances.

  • Maybe the reason why agents or publishers don’t want your book is they curently have similar competing projects in the works.
  • Maybe the reason why you didn’t obtain the job isthat the business thinks someone together with your talent and experience will most likely get poached away by way of a competitor.
  • Maybe the reason why a potential investor made a decision to pass isthat you’ve been introduced at the incorrect stage of the life span cycle of these fund, or they just don’t possess expertise to guage ideas in your industry.

Truthfully, you will most probably never know the unsaid known reasons for most rejections, and that provides you a selection:

  • It is possible to spend plenty of fruitless, frustrating mental energy to attempt to figure it out.
  • Or, it is possible to pick the more emotionally intelligent route: Train you to ultimately play a confident version of the “during intercourse” game, by inventing an all-purpose addition that you could imagine for just about any kind of rejection.

Maybe something similar to, “We’re rejecting you … because we’ve our very own challenges which have nothing in connection with you.”

Granted, in comparison to “during intercourse,” “because we’ve our very own challenges which have nothing in connection with you” isisnowhere near as pithy or humorous as well as nostalgic.

But again, you can just figure out how to us “during intercourse” as a shortcut and a reminder that there surely is always something left unsaid:“We will spread this opportunity but we wish you the very best of luck.” (“During intercourse.”)

Look, I discover the whole idea of emotional intelligence fascinating, but I’m most thinking about practical, actionable strategies: things such as how to pick the proper words, how exactly to see things through other’s eyes, and how exactly to use silence, humor and implicit messaging to communicate effectively.

Because emotional intelligence isn’t about understanding how to develop empathy and treat people nicely, although those could be nice side-benefits.

Instead,when i write in my own free ebook, 9 Smart Habits of individuals With HIGH Emotional Intelligence,it’s about leveraging emotions to create it much more likely you’ll achieve your targets.

It is a good book. In the event that you download it,I believe you’ll appreciate it. (“During intercourse.”)

Or somewhere else for example.

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