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New Tech Could Stop Your Wi-Fi Being Blocked By Pesky Walls

Lots of people spend money on mesh wireless networking answers to eliminate dead spots due to walls along with other barriers. However, imagine if you can effectively get rid of the walls being an obstacle?

Originally reported in Newsweek, Austrian scientists at the Vienna University of Technology and Rennes University detail a way of removing reflections due to dense materials. The scientists revealed their findings in a paper entitled “Anti-reflection structure for perfect ransmission through complex media.”

The scientists liken their treatment for the way the anti-reflective coating on glasses work. The coating allows light to traverse more freely through the lenses and therefore avoid the light from bouncing off the lenses causing reflections. Similarly, the scientists work with a special coating to permit Wi-Fi radio waves to visit easily through solid material.

Sketch of the anti-reflection concept

Sketch of the anti-reflection concept

“You first need to simply send certain waves through the medium and measure just how these waves are reflected by the material,” said Michael Horodynski, among the co-authors. “We could actually show that, with this particular information, a corresponding compensating medium could be calculated for just about any medium that scatters waves in a complex way, so the mix of both media allows the wave to pass completely.”

In laymen’s terms, the scientists could actually mathematically calculate how radio waves undertake a material and use that information to produce a substance which allows it in order to avoid reflections.

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They first attempted microwaves, sending it by way of a “metallic waveguide” that has been filled up with small metal and teflon objects. Only 1 / 2 of the microwaves managed to get through as the rest was reflected. The behavior of the microwaves through the waveguide was measured and an anti-reflective region was made. A subsequent test saw 100 percent of the microwaves complete.

Not merely could this system be used make it possible for better Wi-Fi reception, but other radio waves such as for example cellular and also telescopes that use radio waves to find distant objects in the universe.

Obviously, we’re probably a long way away from any practical applications, however the future implications are indeed interesting. When you await better Wi-Fi, have a look at our deals for OLED gaming TVs and a fresh Dell XPS desktop.

David Matthews is really a Freelance Writer for IGN.

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