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Perseid meteor shower of 2022 thrills stargazers despite bright moon (photos)

Perseid meteors streak over a striking landscape in China with a person holding a flashlight

The Perseid meteor shower illuminates the night time sky on the Eboliang Yardang landform on Aug. 12, 2022 in Haixi Mongolian and Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai Province of China. (Image credit: Wu Zhengjie/VCG via Getty Images)

The Perseid meteor shower of the 2022 reached its peak this weekend even though the bright full moon could have washed out the very best of the “shooting stars” display this season, it doesn’t mean skywatchers were left completely at night.

Stargazers all over the world captured some dazzling views of the Perseid meteor shower since it peaked overnight Friday and Saturday (Aug. 12-13) plus they shared the photos to prove it. Some observers took to Twitter to talk about their meteor views while other astrophotographers snapped truly stunning photos for Getty Images.

“Perseid fireball I saw yesterday evening from Oxfordshire,” skywatcher Mary McIntyre of Oxfordhire in britain wrote (opens in new tab) on Twitter, adding that she captured the Perseid photos with a meteor camera. “The ionization trail was awesome.”

Related: Perseid meteor shower generates early “shooting stars” (video)

The Perseid meteor shower is normally among the best meteor displays of the entire year, but its peak in 2022 came just one single day following the Sturgeon supermoon (August’s full moon) on Aug. 11. Since dark skies are vital for meteor watching, even bright moonlight can dim a stargazer’s prospects.

Photographer Wu Zhengjie for the photo service VCG and Getty Images still were able to capture stunning views of the Perseids from the Eboliang Yardang landform in Haixi Mongolian and Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai Province of China. The images show brilliant Perseid meteors over a striking landscape.

Another view of the Perseid meteor shower on the Eboliang Yardang landform on Aug. 12, 2022 in Haixi Mongolian and Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai Province of China. (Image credit: Wu Zhengjie/VCG via Getty Images)

Another photographer, Veysel Altun of the Anadalou Agency and Getty Images, were able to capture a Perseid meteor streak over a campsite in Samsun, Turkey.

A Perseid meteor streaksover a campsite with a green tent in Turkey

A Perseid meteor streaks over the night sky over Atakum district of Samsun, Turkey on Aug. 13, 2022. (Image credit: Veysel Altun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Photographer Ercin Ertuk, also of the Anadalou Agency and Getty Images, snapped an image of a Perseid since it streaked over the sky over trees in Ankara, Turkey.

A dim Perseid meteor over trees in Turkey.

A view of the Perseid meteor shower over Ankara, Turkey on August 13, 2022. (Image credit: Ercin Erturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Still more stargazers were able to catch views of the Perseids with either their very own cameras or meteor cameras that constantly watch the sky to record fireballs. Here is a look at a few of our favorites spotted on Twitter.

This pebble came a horrible good way before giving me a neat little show the other day. Luckily, there have been plenty of meteors through the #perseid build-up, because through the peak tonight it’ll be tough to see all however the brightest with the entire moon in the sky @BBCStargazing pic.twitter.com/n2iFVBi0p0August 12, 2022

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#Perseid peak night. It’s something, I assume. The entire Moon made this bright, and we were lucky to obtain any clear skies being under a cutoff lower in any case. Fireballs avoided the majority of my cameras, but I acquired them with the 8 mm fisheye. Two -4 mag, one -3 mag Perseids. @ThePhotoHour pic.twitter.com/rbU45Npm5QAugust 13, 2022

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Mag -4.8 #Perseid #fireball I saw yesterday evening from #Oxfordshire It had been detected on our NW #meteorcamera The ionization trail was awesome (I’ll share next!) Canon 1100D + 18-55mm lens 8sec ISO-800 f/3.5 #PerseidMeteorShower #Meteors #Perseids2022 pic.twitter.com/lv2cbkcDsMAugust 13, 2022

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Another #Perseid #IonizationTrail this time around at 23: 54 BST 11th Aug 2022. Extracted from #Oxfordshire UK with Canon 1100D #PerseidMeteorShower #Meteors #Perseids2022 pic.twitter.com/m1ruM4kSTKAugust 12, 2022

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Two #Perseid #Meteors on 2 different DSLRs, both prior to 22: 30 BST 11th Aug ’22. That is 2 of the 6 #Perseids I acquired on camera yesterday evening #Perseids2022 #PerseidMeteorShower pic.twitter.com/L1CB0IM31vAugust 12, 2022

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A wider approach yesterday evening #perseid #meteors with the next Good field of view albeit less detail.2 Cameras planned tonight, wide & not EM-1 mk3, 8mm pro F1.8, ISO320, 15s x 5hrs live composite mode@VirtualAstro @OMSYSTEMcameras pic.twitter.com/4hiJh6iS6MAugust 12, 2022

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The Perseid meteor shower occurs every year in mid-August once the Earth passes through the dusty trail of the Comet Swift-Tuttle. When those comet bits slam into Earth’s atmosphere, they are able to spawn bright trails because the streak over the sky. They may actually radiate right out of the constellation Perseus, hence their name.

Another major meteor shower of 2022 would be the Orionid meteor shower in October. That shower will peak on Oct. 20 and 21, but its activity period runs from Sept. 26 to Nov. 22. It really is due to the remnants of Halley’s Comet because the Earth passes during that trail.

Have a look at our guide for the best meteor showers of the entire year to prepare for the next stargazing experience.

Editor’s note: In the event that you snap an incredible photo of a Perseid meteor or any night-sky sight and you would like to share it with Space.com for a tale or image gallery, send images, comments and location information to spacephotos@space.com.

Email Tariq Malik attmalik@space.com (opens in new tab)or follow him@tariqjmalik (opens in new tab). Follow us@Spacedotcom (opens in new tab),Facebook (opens in new tab)andInstagram (opens in new tab).

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Tariq Malik

Tariq may be the Editor-in-Chief of Space.com and joined the team in 2001, first being an intern and staff writer, and later being an editor. He covers human spaceflight, exploration and space science, along with skywatching and entertainment. He became Space.com’s Managing Editor in 2009 and Editor-in-Chief in 2019. Before joining Space.com, Tariq was an employee reporter for The LA Times covering education and city beats in La Habra, Fullerton and Huntington Beach. He could be also an Eagle Scout (yes, he’s got the area Exploration merit badge) and visited Space Camp four times as a youngster and a fifth time being an adult. He’s got journalism degrees from the University of Southern California and NY University. To see his latest project, it is possible to follow Tariq onTwitter.

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