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Rising seas could destroy an incredible number of U.S. acres in decades

A new report said that rising seas could swallow millions of acres by 2050. File photo by UPI/Gary C. Caskey. | <a href=License Photo” height=”532″ src=”https://cdnph.upi.com/svc/sv/upi/7951662676232/2022/1/81a858fe35184c826eb28d7cc04c2d10/Rising-seas-could-destroy-millions-of-US-acres-in-decades.jpg” title=”A fresh report said that rising seas could swallow an incredible number of acres by 2050. File photo by UPI/Gary C. Caskey. | License Photo” width=”800″>

A fresh report said that rising seas could swallow an incredible number of acres by 2050. File photo by UPI/Gary C. Caskey. | License Photo

Sept. 8 (UPI) — Rising tides because of climate change could flood nearly 650,000 properties and $34 billion worth of property across the nation’s coasts by the entire year 2050, a fresh report has concluded.

The nonprofit organization Climate Central discovered that as much as 4.4 million acres of land are projected to fall below tidal boundaries on the next 30 years. That number could swell to 9.1 million acres by 2100.

“Because the sea is rising, tide lines are upgrading elevation, upslope and inland,” Don Bain, a senior adviser at Climate Central and a specialist in sea level rise, who led the analysis, said. “People really haven’t internalized that yet — that ‘Hey, I’ll have something recinded from me by the ocean.’ “

Hudson County, N.J., gets the distinction of experiencing the highest estimated land value at an increased risk: a lot more than $2.4 billion. A lot more than 15% of the county’s total acreage is below the predicted water levels.

Galveston and Honolulu have $2.37 billion and $2.3 billion at an increased risk respectively.

A lot of the 4.4 million acres at an increased risk are located in only four states: Louisiana, Florida, NEW YORK and Texas.

However, the southern states aren’t the only real major areas at an increased risk. New Jersey, NY and Maryland could each have a large number of buildings impacted, in accordance with researchers.

“Your land will be extracted from you by the rising seas,” Bain said. “Nobody’s discussing that.”

Not merely will the land under water be affected, but many towns and counties may have their entire budgets altered.

The increased loss of taxable value could greatly impact the budgets of several towns and counties, A.R. Siders, an assistant professor in the University of Delaware’s Disaster Research Center, warned.

“In case a town does not have any other income and is relying solely on property tax values, that town isn’t sustainable,” Siders said.

Bain said that the report had not been designed to frighten people, but was instead designed to educate and present people information to combat climate change.

“I believe we are able to have a bright and prosperous future but only when we put our minds and shoulders to it, and so are well-informed and obtain after it.”

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