free counter
World

Rushdie told German magazine his life is currently ‘relatively normal’

The writer Salman Rushdie interviewed during Heartland Festival in Kvaerndrup, Denmark June 2, 2018. Carsten Bundgaard/Ritzau Scanpix/via REUTERS/File Photo

Register now free of charge unlimited usage of Reuters.com

FRANKFURT, Aug 13 (Reuters) – Within an interview conducted just weeks before he was stabbed and seriously wounded by an attacker in NY state, author Salman Rushdie said his life was now “relatively normal”, after having lived in hiding for a long time due to death threats.

Rushdie talked in the interview with Germany’s Stern magazine concerning the threats he sees to U.S. democracy. He also known as himself an optimist, and noted that the fatwa, a religious edict issued in Iran in 1989 that called on Muslims all over the world to kill him for blasphemy, was pronounced way back when.

The interview is because of come in the magazine on Aug. 18, but Stern released it on Saturday, each day following the attack on Rushdie. The interview was conducted about fourteen days ago, the magazine’s editorial office said. read more

Register now free of charge unlimited usage of Reuters.com

The first choice of Irans 1979 Islamic revolution, the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, issued the fatwa after Rushdie’s novel “The Satanic Verses” book was condemned as blasphemous. He went into hiding for pretty much a decade however in modern times has lived relatively openly.

Indian-born Rushdie, who became a U.S. citizen in 2016 and lives in NEW YORK, said he was concerned about threats to democracy in the usa.

They were driven by racism and hatred of the accomplishments of liberalism, and constituted “an initial stage of fascism,” he said.

“(Former U.S. President Donald) Trump’s victory over facts are most significant there. His people think that they’re lied to by others, not by him,” he said.

Trump claims falsely that the November 2020 presidential election he lost to Joe Biden was stolen through widespread voting fraud.

Asked whether he was nostalgic, Rushdie, 75, said, “Definitely not. I really like history, however when it concerns my very own life, I favor to check ahead.”

NY police have identified the suspect in the attack on Rushdie as Hadi Matar, a 24-year-old man from Fairview, NJ, who had bought a pass to the function at the Chautauqua Institution. Police haven’t established a motive.

Register now free of charge unlimited usage of Reuters.com

Reporting by Vera EckertEditing by Frances Kerry

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Read More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker