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The group mirror test that hinted at 2023 F1 rule change

Indeedjust four teams optedto bring new parts to a circuit that hasverydifferent demands to both circuitsthat are either side of it in the schedule.

But that didn’t stop Fridays free practice session supplying a little tech intrigue, as there is an organization test being completed with respect to the FIA.

Itfollowedtests by Red Bull in Hungaryand Mercedes inBelgium of larger rear view mirrors,that your governing bodyispotentially considering introducing for 2023 and beyond to greatly help improve safety.

Rear view mirrors have always been a concern in F1, with aerodynamicists keen to mitigate their ill effectsevenat the trouble of the drivers capability to see whats happening around and in it.

Within their quest to suppress the aerodynamic inefficiencies themirrorspose, the designers took not only to presenting the tiniest body round the mirror thats possible, theyve also lent right into a trend that uses flow conditioning appendages to improve the span of the airflow too.

As youd expectas section of a test over the grid,there is a range of different solutions between the teams because they hoped to glean some insightfor both themselves and the FIA.

Mercedes W13 2023 mirrors dim

Mercedes W13 2023 mirrors dim

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As the main body of the mirrors will be increased, this is actually the consequence of the mirrors reflective surface being enlarged.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Mercedes W13 mirrors

Mercedes W13 mirrors

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The perfect solution is presented by Mercedes saw the W13 fitted with a mirror casing thats almost doubled high in comparison to its regular solution.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Red Bull Racing RB18 mirror detail

Red Bull Racing RB18 mirror detail

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The perfect solution is tested by Red Bull can be much bigger than were used to seeing, with the height almost doubled as a result.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Red Bull Racing RB18 mirror detail

Red Bull Racing RB18 mirror detail

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For comparison, heres the most common solution that Red Bull would use, with small main mirror casing framed by winglets top and bottom.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Sergio Perez, Red Bull Racing RB18

Sergio Perez, Red Bull Racing RB18

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This shot is ideal for comparative purposes as Red Bull actually opted to mount both regular and larger mirrors on either side of the automobile.

Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

AlphaTauri AT03 mirror

AlphaTauri AT03 mirror

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Alpha Tauri opted to widen their mirror assembly, instead of raise the height.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

AlphaTauri AT03 mirror

AlphaTauri AT03 mirror

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Heres an assessment shot showing the standard width mirror assembly.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Aston Martin AMR22 mirror

Aston Martin AMR22 mirror

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Aston Martin probably had probably the most developed solution on the grid, with the team creating a wider version of its regular design, filled with all of the aerodynamic appendages it could will often have.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari F1-75

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari F1-75

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Ferrari chosen the lengthened version of its mirror, albeit minus the vortex generators which are normally on the lower of the assembly.

Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

Fernando Alonso, Alpine A522

Fernando Alonso, Alpine A522

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Alpines mirror was a straightforward extension of the mirror layout normally on the A522.

Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

Alex Albon, Williams FW44

Alex Albon, Williams FW44

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Williams, meanwhile, chosen a much bigger mirror body overall.

Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

Lando Norris, McLaren MCL36

Lando Norris, McLaren MCL36

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The enlarged mirrors utilized by McLaren meant that the team removed the most common framing winglets.

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

Daniel Ricciardo, McLaren MCL36

Daniel Ricciardo, McLaren MCL36

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For comparison the standard mirror configuration includes a smaller body and a winglet that surrounds it.

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

Valtteri Bottas, Alfa Romeo C42

Valtteri Bottas, Alfa Romeo C42

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Alfa Romeos test mirrors were also extended to create them wider than theyd usually be.

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

The specific updates

Alpinehasbeen probably the most proactive teams on the grid this year with regards to delivering new parts, with the Enstone-based outfit having something new offered by every race of the growing season up to now.

Obviously a few of the packages which have arrived have already been bigger than others, but its interesting to see thatit hasbeen in a position to keep a reliable blast of development coming during that not merely takes influence from those arounditbut hasitsown design hallmarks stamped onit too.

For the Dutch Grand Prix, the team had some optimisations that looked to boost upon the pre-existing downforce package thatitplanned to utilize as of this venue.

At the front end of the automobile this has led to a minor change to leading wings design, with a fresh flap introduced to lessen downforce and help balance the automobile for the changes imposed at the trunk.

Alpine A522 rear wing detail

Alpine A522 rear wing detail

Photo by: Uncredited

The beam wing has been modified by Alpine guiding the automobile, with a shorter chord upper element working initsstacked, bi-plane-like arrangement.

Its worth notingithad two configurations available as yet, medium-high downforce and low downforce. This new arrangement will fit somewhere among the two, or perhaps outright replace the medium to high downforce option.

AlphaTauritargetted the Dutch GPas a chance to make improvements toitsrear wing, with the Faenza based squad making changes to the transition where in fact the wing elements meet up with the endplate.

AlphaTauri AT03 rear windetail

AlphaTauri AT03 rear windetail

Photo by: Jon Noble

The arc is currently a lot more tightly wound, which escalates the span of the mainplane and top flap, with a more substantial wing-tip cutout employed to pay for the excess vorticity that may otherwise have ensued.

Williams had a fresh front wing atitsdisposal for the Dutch Grand Prix, with the team making changes for the very first time of this type sinceitsupdate at Silverstone.

The changes didnt require a completely new wing to be manufactured either, that is obviously good whenever we think about the cost cap, with the outboard portion of top of the flaps and the transition with the endplate singled-out as a spot that could create a performance uplift.

Williams FW44

Williams FW44

Photo by: Jon Noble

This portion of the wing is relatively sensitive given the performance trade-off which has to be accepted between creating downforce with the flaps and utilizing the juncture to influence the outwash that the wing generates.

Alfa Romeomade changes toitsrear brake duct at the Dutch Grand Prix, with the team targetting a rise in performance that wouldnt only be limited by the track characteristics at Zandvoort.

At this juncture, its the deflector shape thats been altered, with the team anticipating an uplift in performance to the neighborhood flow whilst coming with the secondary good thing about improving flow through the diffuser.

The team fitted a big kiel probe rake guiding the C42 duringfreepractice to guarantee the parts performed asitssimulations had predicted (below).

Valtteri Bottas, Alfa Romeo C42, Zhou Guanyu, Alfa Romeo C42

Valtteri Bottas, Alfa Romeo C42, Zhou Guanyu, Alfa Romeo C42

Photo by: Alfa Romeo

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