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This 41-year-old left the U.S. for Bangkok and lives a ‘luxurious lifestyle’ on $8,000 per month

Jesse Schoberg began plotting his escape from Elkhorn, Wisconsin, where he was created and raised, when he was an adolescent. “It’s your typical small town in the Midwest: small, quiet, not an excessive amount of adventure,” he tells CNBC ENSURE IT IS. “I usually knew that I needed to obtain out and explore the planet.”

The 41-year-old entrepreneur has been living abroad for 14 years, splitting his time among a lot more than 40 countries and he’s got no plans to come back to the U.S. any time in the future.

Schoberg bucked the original path of attending college and securing a 9-to-5 job, instead choosing to go to Madison when he was 19, sharpening his coding skills and helping businesses making use of their web page design and development.

By enough time he turned 27, however, Schoberg begun to feel restless. He made a decision to move to a fresh city and researched apartments in Austin and Denver, but his mind kept drifting to Panama City, the administrative centre of Panama, where he previously “among the best vacations of his life,” as he recalls.

He moved to Panama City in 2008 and lived there for six years before packing his bags to visit the world regular as an electronic nomad, a movement he previously learned all about, and was inspired to use, throughout a work retreat in Curaao.

Among his travels, Schoberg now calls Bangkok home. He relocated to Thailand in December 2021 and shares a one-bedroom apartment along with his fiancee, Janine.

“The standard of life in Thailand when compared to United States, is way better for 90% of things and much more stress-free,” he says. “It is also easier to afford a lavish lifestyle.”

Learning to be a digital nomad

Schoberg has generated a formidable career being an entrepreneur and web developer, earning a six-figure salary every year but his success didn’t happen overnight.

When he first moved to Panama, Schoberg brought the net design and development firm he established in the U.S. and his set of clients with him.

In 2013, Schoberg and two of his friends who had caused him on previous projects for the firm, Jason Mayfield and Laura Lee, created DropInBlog, a software start-up that helps site owners add an SEO-optimized blog to nearly every platform in minutes.

Today, DropInBlog comes with an all-remote staff of 12 employees, with Schoberg at the helm as CEO.

Becoming their own boss gave Schoberg a far more flexible schedule, and he used his newfound leisure time to visit: After visiting several countries in SOUTH USA, including Colombia and Costa Rica, he made a decision to have a look at Asia, living for short stints in Taiwan, Japan and the Philippines (where he met his fiancee on a Tinder date).

In 2015, Schoberg stopped in Thailand and he immediately knew he found his new home. “When I got eventually to Bangkok for the very first time, it just had that pulse that felt familiar to Panama City there’s just this incredible energy on the road and with individuals,” he says. “I knew immediately that Bangkok would be my Panama City 2.0.”

Schoberg and his fiancee have already been splitting their time taken between Mexico City and Bangkok as he waits for his Thai Elite Visa, a 5-year renewable visa that costs about $18,000 and provides you unlimited usage of Thailand along with entry and exit privileges.

‘I live better here than I did so in the U.S.’

Since moving to Bangkok, Schoberg has had the opportunity to invest more on travel, dining along with other hobbies and also boost his savings. “While I could afford a fairly nice life in the U.S., I live better here than I did so in the U.S.,” he says. “The amount of services that you will get here fancier concert halls, nice cars completely blow away everything you enter the U.S.”

Being an entrepreneur and CEO, Schoberg earns about $230,000 each year. His biggest expenses are his rent and utilities, which together are about $2,710 every month. Schoberg and his fiancee reside in a one-bedroom apartment in a building with an exclusive gym, pool, co-working space, restaurant and daily cleaning service.

He and Janine spend about $1,900 every month on takeout and eating out, often ordering food from local restaurants on a favorite app called gopanda. Schoberg’s go-to meals are laos khao soi, a tomato noodle soup with ground meat, and pad krapow, a spicy basil chicken dish. Both meals usually cost $2-$3, Schoberg says, and local restaurants will most likely give long-term customers discounts.

The meals scene, he says, is really a “huge plus” to surviving in Thailand, and something of the primary reasons he thought we would proceed to Bangkok. “Bangkok comes with an amazing culinary scene, you have almost every kind of food on earth here,” Schoberg says. “Coming from my apartment, there is a Belgian sandwich shop and a Vietnamese barbeque joint.”

Here is a monthly break down of Schoberg’s spending (by June 2022):

Rent and utilities: $2,709.52

Food: $1,900.52

Transportation: $197

Phone: $40

Medical health insurance: $280.39

Subscriptions: $78.48

Discretionary: $2,669.37

Total: $7,875.28

The Thai culture and folks are “much friendlier and much more relaxed” than in the U.S., Schoberg adds, even though English is spoken in the popular tourist regions, like Bangkok, learning Thai has given Schoberg “an enormous advantage” as a foreigner.

He attends two Thai classes weekly, which costs $269.44 per month, and stresses that “it is possible to really take part in the culture and also have an improved life” in Bangkok when you can understand Thai.

As a fresh resident, Schoberg continues to be exploring Bangkok and all that it provides, including its many malls, parks, restaurants and concert venues among the magical areas of surviving in Bangkok, he adds, is that it could feel just like you’re surviving in two different cities simultaneously.

“You have the street-level city, that is your meal vendors, people running to work, taxis and motorbikes,” he says. “And there’s this sky city that’s happening in the skyscrapers, with fancy rooftop bars, working spaces and malls here, you have the contrast of the Chanel store to the 20-cent pork skewer being grilled on the road.”

Planning for a life of travel

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